PUFS.com
Posted 07/02/2022 in Guns and Self-Defense

How Does The Supreme Court Gun Ruling Expand Gun Rights?


How Does The Supreme Court Gun Ruling Expand Gun Rights?

It is not every day in America that there is a huge win for the 2nd Amendment, but that day has come. On June 23, 2022 the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) struck down New York State’s extremely draconian conceal carry laws as unconstitutional. Furthermore, the justices found the laws to not only violate the 2nd Amendment, but also, the 14th Amendment which ensures all Americans cannot be deprived their rights by any state within the Union.



This is the most important 2nd Amendment ruling since 2008 in D.C. vs. Heller, in which SCOTUS ruled the individual citizen has the right to own and possess arms. This most recent ruling confirms American citizens have a right to bear arms in public for personal protection, thus reinforcing the American and natural right to defend yourself with arms, both in private and in public.


In order to find one of the, if not the key point in this case, we need to familiarize ourselves with the Sullivan Act. The Sullivan Act was a gun control law in New York, established in 1911. The Act put into place a license system (similar to many states) for the carry of concealed weapons, but also made New York state a “may issue” state. This meant a citizen had to present a valid reason to carry a weapon to the State, in order to possibly be granted a carry permit. However, a state is not obligated to issue a permit under the “may issue” criteria, and can deny a request for any reason.



In order to find one of the, if not the key point in this case, we need to familiarize ourselves with the Sullivan Act. The Sullivan Act was a gun control law in New York, established in 1911. The Act put into place a license system (similar to many states) for the carry of concealed weapons, but also made New York state a “may issue” state. This meant a citizen had to present a valid reason to carry a weapon to the State, in order to possibly be granted a carry permit. However, a state is not obligated to issue a permit under the “may issue” criteria, and can deny a request for any reason.



“New York is one of six states and the District of Columbia that operate under such a “may issue” regime,” and as a result of the SCOTUS ruling, we have already seen changes occurring in these states; they have had to put out memos practically overnight informing issuing law enforcement parties to no longer require/request a proper cause.

In legal situations like this, it is always best to keep up with the news cycle, 2nd Amendment social media contributors, and all legal information that is put out by each state government (and the federal government). This is a fluid situation and all of the legal implications at the state level are still being figured out by all states in the Union, especially in the states that are not pro-gun.



Overall, American citizens will see an increase in their rights and freedoms, but new legal battles are now on the horizon. Advocates on both sides of this issue will now try to further define, open or restrict, and fight for what they legally interpret as justifiable carry in public spaces. Leadership in New York and other anti-gun states have already expressed their intent to protract the legal debate on these details for some time to come. Thus, it is best for citizens to keep up with the latest information and continue to follow all laws and regulations as they are written and enforced.


Again, this is an ongoing situation, with the long-term positive effects for the 2nd Amendment yet to be truly felt. However, many 2A advocates see this as a major step to reinforcing our natural and legal rights to being a well-armed citizenry, just as our founding fathers intended. This is a direct link to the SCOTUS ruling.


Copyright © 2022 PUFS Inc. All rights reserved.